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and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage
and one of the underserved policy topics in the united states. the native-born population of the u.s. doesn't have replacement fertility rates so all future population growths comes from what we choose and this is the issue over the longer term, so those things strike me as central as to how it will work out. seems to me we have a couple things. first is to recognize it is time to look forward. this crisis began years ago now, and i was once in the camp of designing very clever policies, i promise you they were very clever. al solved all these problems, but more policy and inknow vacation and programs and intervention i think is now making it too difficult to figure out what the rules are and move forward. more policy innovation. that is making it difficult to figure out what the rules are. it is time to let markets clear. that's point number one. the example is the basil three zero courts and the implementation. if you look at the credit implications of those rules verses normal lending circa 2001. we're on track to thrive for 25% fewer mortgages then if we have the standard for 200
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014
to go to brazil six months ago, if you told me the u.s. had just run faster, -- grown faster, 2.7%, we're expecting the u.s. economy to grow to%. the reason i raise this is to go down there and talk to policy makers and business people. we could have more taxes here, more regulation there. a little more cost of labor here. and a fair amount of uncertainty and take on one of the great economic miracles. they understand this thing they have a great economy growing rapidly is fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than later uncertainty. that is almost like a test tube of forcing. we had a time in which we had a huge amount of uncertainty. comes from -- some comes from government action. we had an aggressive regulatory agenda. we have not made a certain investments we have made. you add that up and you have a period in which businesses are operating under huge weight. creates the conditions under which businesses can operate in intellectual freedom. among the things government can do is create the conditions under which cost [no audio] to allow businesses to innovate. >> one
work them up into a frenzy about the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a ph
for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the other guy. i understand this is a team sport, a competitive environment we are in, but at the end of the day, if we're not solving problems, it is pretty of the. >> -- empty. >> can you trace the trajectory of the partisanship? >> i can see it very directly going back to 1994. newt gingrich, he had a vie
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
at the history of what has been done. there is a long history of using that debt limit as a moment to distract from the party in power. if we had an academic seminar on the impact of the that struggle and the fiscal policy, he would say that it was a negative thing. >> well, i have never until last year of august 2011, i have not seen any serious effort or serious threat made by the leadership of congress to refuse to give the secretary of treasury the ability to offer to meet obligations congress had adopted. i thought that was a new experience for us. it certainly was for me to see that happen. dr. zandi, you said you think that we need to repeal this law that tries to set a debt limit and concentrate more on taxing and spending policies that causes to raise the debt, as i understand? >> absolutely. it is a bad way to conduct policy. it is a problem. look at july and august of 2011. it was a mess. gdp downgraded the debt. it really had an impact. cbo is estimating the interest costs is costing us money. it is pretty clear that this is not going to get any better going forward. it will be wor
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
be spending that money. let us get on with building a business. society should do it. people should take that as a given. i know the rest of us have it. we would gladly get rid of all of that in a minute. it is a health care issue. we talked about technology and data sharing. there are productivity, issues that are significant. >> i want to touch on some other hot-button topics we have not discussed as much. capital gains, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, sharehol
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
to us there wasn't anything we couldn't do. there is no limits as to how far we can go. we have limits because we got here late, the language, the skills, but you can be anything you want. and i can't tell you how important that is for a young person to not only have dreams and believe those dreams are possible. if i worry about anything, i spoke about this last night, young americans aren't dreaming or aren't believing the dreams are accessible to them. >> >> you mentioned mitt romney who until three weeks ago was the leader of the party. mitt romney going to disappear or does he have a continuing role? >> i hope he doesn't disappear and hope he has a continuing role. first of all, very few people have done what he has done, run for president and be the nominee of the party. >> and get crushed. >> that's not accurate. he got 47%. he won a lot of states. he didn't lose 49-1. he won places and has a lot of supporters. but he has been successful at life. and i told him this, too. mitt romney is a role model as a person, a father, husband, community leader. he has a lot to offer the repub
. the delay in the spending cuts whatsoever. do you think the president's current offer gives us the 2-1 test? >> no. it is short. he needs to come up with roughly $600 billion more in spending cuts over the next 10 years. i think that there are significant reforms in medicare, medicaid, agricultural subsidies, and other programs in the budget. those are difficult things to implement. it takes a lot of guts to propose those things. i would not discount them. they are important. to answer your question more specifically, we do name or spending cuts to get to my ideal. -- we need more spending cuts to get to my ideal. >> policymakers need to reform entitlements. i do see members of the other party -- most notably, mr. hoyer --he said, not now. they are on the table for a later discussion. i have been disappointed that a lot of the discussion seems to be on the revenue side and not really on the cutting side. really quickly, the debt ceiling. there is something about your testimony that caught my attention, which is your support for the initiative offered by senator rob portman. lawmakers can ad
against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the january 1 deadline before and get 30-day extensions. at some point they were working without an extension. medicare told doctors to hold off on submitting your claims for a little bit. that is a situation we have ended up in before. if we're talking months, we're talking about big pay cuts for medicare doctors. that would be uncharted territory. host: joe from arizona on the republican line. caller: good morning. if we look at it logically, sarah is on the right track. we have become a society with honesty as a technicality. you can get more money but you break the law. our society -- you need to stop your people on the show, politicians and say, i asked you a question and you didn't answer it. this is why the doctors in medicar
it is embarrassing to compared government funding for amtrak with u.s. government funding for domestic aviation and highway speed passenger >> to build and maintain one of the best highways systems in the world, we've spent $114 billion and built it over 45 years and today it would be $126 billion. con jex on our roads are at historic levels and by 2020 urban interstates will be at or over capacity. and anyone who has had the pleasure of flying recently they know the problems that plag our nation's airport ch airports, in fact, in spite of all this amtrak carries more riders from new york to boston than all other airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of hig
massachusetts. mr. markey: and if barney frank was down here, none of us would have -- none of this would have happened in terms of the understanding of the parliamentary procedure. he was up there trying to grab an managenary microphone. . john oliver has been for us -- olver, has been for us an invaluable colleague. he taught so much to us. when he sat down with us talking about transportation, he explained our own districts to us as far as what was possible. on climate change, i talked to him for about 20 years. he was on this issue in the early 1990's and probably understood it probably even before that. he is that smart. he is that visionary in terms of the issues are essential not just to massachusetts, but to our planet. and it has been migrate honor to have served with you, john and to have called you my friend and colleague overall of these years and we thank you so much for what you have done for us and for the country and thank you. and with that -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. under the speaker's announced policy of january 5, 2011, the gentleman from
military. and so when i see raises for the troops it pleases i think all of us. i'm concerned about the afghanistan timeline. i had hoped that it could be expedited. i certainly do commend the iron dome because we saw it work with respect to israel. i question however the drones that may have collateral damage. but i do think it's important that this bill does in fact make a commitment to protecting the women and children of afghanistan, responds to the issues dealing with sexual assault against military personnel and particularly women and it's strong on iran sanctions. . i rise today as well because when we talk about people we talk about men and women in the united states military, we talk about their health. yesterday in the rules committee i raised this point and i raise it again, i'm going to support this bill because i think it will make a leap of faith commitment to finding the cause of triple negative breast cancer. they are usually of a higher grade and size, onset at a younger age, more aggressive, and more likely to metastasize. the survival rate for breast cancer may ha
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory
later, we will discuss the recent increase in u.s. manufacturing. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, december 19, 2012. the white house has thrown its support behind several gun- control measures on tuesday in the wake of the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut. a state department inquiry into the september 11 terror attack in benghazi, libya, criticized the agency harshly for inadequate security that -- but specificrecommend signi individuals. and we begin today in on the details of john boehner's plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. we want to hear from you. how optimistic are you that a compromise can still be reached before the end of the year? give us a call -- and you can get up with us on all your social media web sites on facebook and twitter, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. i want to take you to the lead story in today's washington post. that was today's washington post. here's the headlines from "politico" today. i want to take you to speaker john boehner's comments on the state
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
's not on that face. >> i've been on that bus. >> they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experiences, this phenomenon, that so many of us had experienced in one way or another, and had no words for. other than adolescence, other than growing up. we finally -- people were starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hirsch and i decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say this isn't something that we can accept anymore. a normal part of our culture. >> film maker cynthia loewen has followed up her award winning film by gathering essays and personal stories in "bully." hear more tonight at 10:00 on "after words" on c-span2 and more book tv online, and like us on facebook. next chiefs of staff to the governors of virginia, colorado, and oklahoma talk about the fiscal issues of their
eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different histori
. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever i went, people would say, i work for jack kemp. that legacy lives on some much because of the connection to the family. there was something this legacy .as such reach hi it is an honor to be a part of this an. jack kemp was my mentor. knowing jack kemp was one of the greatest experiences of my life. i was lucky to work with him. i do not know if bill is here. he has to wake up really early in the morning to do his radio show. he and i served in the house of representatives. we had our top hits. -- tough hits. we share something in common. we both used to be the next vice president of the united states. [applause] though i wish this election turned out a little differently, i am proud of a campaign has mitt romney and i ran. he would have been a great president. it would have been an honor to serve at his side. we gave this rac
of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 229. the nays are 182. 2/3 not being in the affirmative, the rules are not suspended and the bill is not passed. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leaves of absence for mr. griffin of arkansas for the week of december 11 and mr. reyes of texas for today and for the balance of the week. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the requests are granted. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: members and staff, please remove your conversations from the floor. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from massachusetts rise? >> address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, earlier this year -- mr. frank: i was c
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
.irs.gov. host: nina olson, welcome back to c-span and thank you for being with us. host: we want to welcome sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we a
for free transcripts or to give us your comments about this program, visit us at q-and- a.org. >> tonight on the c-span bbc parliament's year-end review. and later another look at "q&a" with author kevin phillips. >> $50,000 in total prizes. the deadline's january 18th. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next, "bbc parliament's westminster review" takes a look back at all the major reviews. the debates with the prime minister on the british economy and the european union budget. the british particle jment in recess for the holidays. members return on january 7th. >> hello there. and welcome to the west minister review. our look back at the big events in parliament over the last three months. coming up in this program, the chancellor delivers the latest bleak economic view? his budget. david cameron's bench urges him to stand up to europe. >> i support absolutely. >> the ugly spector of child abuse hits the deadlines with some dramatic consequences. lord justin levison delivers his plan on press standards. >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the pote
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
>> let us pray. gracious god, sovereign lord of history, thank you for the exemplary impact of senator daniel ken inouye on our national history. lord, we are grateful for the excellence that distinguished his significant career for the quiet grace and dignity with which he represented the aloha state. and for the gift of discernment that enabled him to serve you faithfully for the good of america. as we express gratitude for the laudable footprints he left in the sands of time, give us your power to persevere impromptly doing what is right. may the memory of senator inouye's indefatigable faithfulness provide a benchmark for the lives of all who labor for liberty. lord, intensify our dedication to make sacrifices for the good of our nation and world as we put our trust in you to do for us immeasurably, abundantly, above all that we can ask or imagine, according to your power working in and through us. we pray in your sovereign name. amen. >> senator dan inouye was a noble soul. one of the finest men i've ever met. united states senate and entire country are poorer for his l
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
. it used to be a staple of small- business lending. you have a track record, a clear plan, they will make you a loan on your ability to pursue that. that is gone. they are in the same boat. they cannot get the loan. >> i am curious from the small business perspective, i think small businesses are coming up a lot right now as we talk about tax rates and making sure you protect small businesses. do you feel the issue is the most crucial for small businesses, or is it things like financing the -- >> rates are important on the tax front for small companies, i think the most important things are having a long-term sense of the code and try to grapple with tax reform to simplify the code. a center of our own polling, yes, they do not like playing -- paying the tax rates. the bigger thing is the burden of complying with the tax code the half. you have to remember small business people pay taxes at individual rates. they do not populate their income the same way individuals do. they have to deal with the business side to see what their tax code is. they also pay the taxes themselves. like most wo
. host: sarah kliff covers health care for "the washington post." thank you for joining us. we take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the
we have been talking with retiring congressional members. join us later tonight for a sixth-down we recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another
, a discussion on the impact of skilled immigrant labor on the u.s. economy. at 11:00 q&a with crystal wright. there is another chance to see david cameron take questions from the house of commons. >> i don't mean just the channel but the able to find surprises. every month or every year i get some show that people are talking about that i don't think you can have imagined choosing. you could not convince me to choose honey boo boo. or a certain food channel networks. i don't think if i had to predetermine that was my preference i would have ever picked them. but the ability to stumble on them, to hear people talk about them and let me go into an environment and suddenly find i like honey boo boo and i'm watching its. i think that is a huge part of the experience and i think it is sold short. i still think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and being able to roam around the tv jungle finding things they did not know were there. >> ice -- i think people still love discovery. every month or every year, i hear some show people are suddenly talking about that i do not think you cou
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
. the second deadline that comes along as february 15, next year. that is when we have asked states to tell us they want to be a denture a partnership exchange. we will know more as far as how many work with us. >> thank you for being here and congratulations on the work in maryland. we are very proud of that. i wanted to ask you in view of the fact states will be making a judgment on whether they can stand up to a state based exchange, and another basis we will be looking at the partnership model, you spoke with your colleagues around the country who are making these decisions. what are the kinds of it zaidi's they express to you that you are able to say, look, there is a way to do this. rather it is a certain technical thing or the process of how you get a consensus behind it and get people comfortable moving forward, what are you saying to your colleagues who may be one to get there but are worried a little bit about it based on the maryland experience, it can give them some comfort and confidence they can do this? >> thank you for your question and your leadership in maryland. there is a l
larger water heaters are within the scope of the energy policy act and are rated using a thermal efficiency or t.e. rating. the problem facing american manufacturers is that under the current rules of the road only the small water heaters are deemed eligible for the energy star program. this is nonsensical. it's an outdated measure. and disqualifies our large american made water heaters from being covered by the energy star ratings, regardless of how advanced or how highly efficient they may be. . the legislation before us today would provide the necessary regulatory and business certainty that is needed by our manufacturers. this legislation has the potential of adding upwards of 1,000 jobs for domestic water heater manufacturers, many of them are in my home state of tennessee, where there are already 3,000 jobs directly involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the ge
. >> because you're using the driver's license number or last four digits of your social security number and checking that. before that envelope is opened they check that against the statewide voter data fwace where your signature exists on electronic file and where all of that information exists or the physical copy of it. that's the same thing if you vote by mail. again, you don't leave home to vote in ohio. we have an entire buffet of options for voting and we have built in safeguards for doing so. >> that discussion just got extremely technical. >> it did. sorry. >> but there's a point to be made i think from how technical that discussion was. who are the people who are going to be implementing an i.d. requirement on election day? they are poll workers who work once or twice a year, get paid very little money and it's tough. and to be a poll worker. and it's tough with all these rules and the more technical they get, the more mistakes will be made. i wonder if there's something that just cries out for simplicity in terms of i.d. requirements, and maybe no i.d. requirements because it
for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really put bloomberg on the map here in d.c.. yesterday it was his birthday -- happy birthday, al. [applause] i'm going to turn things over to congressman tom davis -- this is a man who really needs no introduct
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